The easiest and fastest way to make an excellent pot of red beans and rice without skimping out on the flavor is to use Blue Runner canned Creole-Style red beans. I use this easy Blue Runner Red Beans and Rice recipe when I don’t have time to slow cook a pot of dried beans on the stove top, or when I’m up north at our family cottage and we’d rather cruise around the lake on the rowboat instead of keeping a watchful eye on a pot of beans.

And that’s a true story.

(Here I am cleaning the boat out for the first time this season.)

My wife loves Blue Runner beans and it’s more of a treat when I cook them compared to when I use Camellia red beans – which is the majority of the time. I either order Camellia beans online or receive them as gifts so it seems like I have an endless supply of them. For some reason when it comes to Blue Runner, I don’t know if it’s because they’re in cans and they’re heavier, but I’d rather get them when we go down south to either visit family or go to New Orleans.

On our trip to NOLA last summer, my wife asked my oldest son if he’d want to move there. He thought it over for a minute then said, “it depends on how the Walmart is.”

She laughed.

I quickly did a search and found the Walmart Supercenter on Bullard Avenue.

On our way home on I-10, we just so happened to swing by that Walmart and ended up spending a small fortune. In fact, we spent more money on that trip to Walmart than our three-day stay at Place d’Armes in the French Quarter! I admit it, I bought a lot of beans.

There were walls of Blue Runner canned red beans, for god’s sake!

But what killed the wallet was the aisles of New Orleans Saints merchandise. (I’m still upset that I didn’t buy the neon fleur de lis light.)

Needless to say, the trip to Walmart didn’t win any of them over enough to move down to the Crescent City. I still have work to do! They know how much New Orleans means to me. I love the feeling of being there and taking in the sights, and sounds, and sometimes the smells. The city and people and culture will always hold a special place in my heart. However, I might need to find a different Walmart…

And to show you just how much red beans mean to me, (and how much my wife likes Blue Runner red beans), we were excited to see this billboard:

We snapped a picture of the billboard and thought about circling around again for a better shot!

For a billboard.

I still can’t believe that we freaked out and became emotional from seeing a billboard for Blue Runner red beans.

Easy Blue Runner Red Beans & Rice Recipe by RedBeansAndEric.comThe best part about Blue Runner red beans is that all you need to do is heat them up. They do taste great on their own and could be served over hot cooked rice with a smoked sausage and it would be a perfectly fine meal. However, I like to add to the beans. And even with the additional ingredients, I can have the meal served in no time which makes this perfect to prepare at the cottage. (This is also a handy recipe on those days when there are a lot of errands to run and I still want to participate in a Red Bean Monday.)

Easy Blue Runner Red Beans & Rice Recipe by RedBeansAndEric.comPull up a picnic table, enjoy great outdoors, and have an amazing bowl of red beans and rice!

What do you like to include in your Blue Runner red beans and rice meal?

Easy Blue Runner Red Beans & Rice Recipe by RedBeansAndEric.com

Print Recipe
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Instructions
  1. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Saute the diced bacon bits and ham. (The ham that I used was leftovers from a seasoned ham cooked at Christmas time. The ham was seasoned with Creole seasoning. This added a nice depth of flavor to the final outcome of this meal. To achieve the same effect, you can add 1 tsp of Creole seasoning to this step, if desired.) After five minutes, add the onion, green bell pepper, celery, and garlic to the pot and cook until the trinity has softened, about 8-10 minutes.
  2. Carefully pour the chicken stock into the pot along with adding all the seasoning: Creole seasoning, basil, oregano, red pepper flakes, white pepper, and the bay leaves. Mix the seasoning in with the added stock and be sure to scrape up any bits of bacon or ham that stuck to the bottom of the pot.
  3. Add the cans of red beans to the pot and mix well. I feel that two cans is perfect but you could add a third can if desired. If you use a third can and the consistency is to thick, either add more chicken stock or water.
  4. Bring the pot to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for 25 minutes. Remove bay leaves and discard.
  5. Serve the red beans with hot cooked white rice. You can garnish with parsley, green onions, or crumbled bleu cheese.
Recipe Notes

If you need the red beans to be thicker, you can add a third can to the pot; keep the pot simmering until all of the beans are heated through. If the beans are too thick for your taste, slowly add more chicken stock or water to the pot until you get the consistency that you like.


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Keep the red beans cookin’!

Eric

2 Comments

  1. Lynneah Bennett

    July 19, 2018 at 4:30 pm

    Yum! I have never thought to serve beans with rice. But your meal sounds awesome! It is also nice to see a food blog written by a man for once. Great work!

    Reply
    • Red Beans & Eric

      July 19, 2018 at 4:39 pm

      Ha thank you, Lynneah! Red beans and rice is an amazing tasting meal!

      Reply

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